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CURRENT CONDITIONS
32° F

A handful of short to moderate length trails treat users to unobstructed views of the Columbia Basin. From atop Badger Mountain, the unique geology and agriculture of eastern Washington is on display. Friends of Badger Mountain, a local group, has preserved this landscape with health and wellness in mind. Enjoy two trailheads and eight miles of well manicured trails. The plan is for these trails to connect with other trail systems in the area.

  • What To Do
    • Hiking

      Five crushed rock based trails interconnect around the Badger Mountain Centennial Preserve. Trails vary from half a mile to just over three miles in length. Four of the trails are multi-use. The Canyon Trail is open to foot traffic only and is accessed via the Badger Mountain Trailhead next to Trailhead Park. Visit the Friends of Badger Mountain trail page for detailed maps, descriptions, and rules.

    • Mountain Biking

      Four crushed rock based trails interconnect around Badger Mountain Centennial Preserve. These trails are meant for leisure riding to enjoy big views and nature, not for high speed downhill racing. Please respect the "No Skid" signs. Visit the Friends of Badger Mountain trail page for detailed maps, descriptions, and rules.

  • What To Expect

    Badger Mountain Centennial Preserve offers a wonderful contrast to the fog the Walla Walla valley can experience in winter. If snow sports just don't interest you, heading west in winter can keep you hiking and biking year round. Be prepared when using this area in the summer as you are in a desert. Pack lots of water and sunscreen. Try to catch a sunrise or watch the sunset from time to time. Visit the Friends of Badger Mountain website for more detailed information regarding trail descriptions, wildlife, flora, and events.

  • When To Go

    The trails are open year round; however, they are not maintained in winter. True to eastern Washington and the Columbia Basin geology, expect full sun exposure in the summer.

  • How To Get There

    Please do not solely rely on Google Maps as their route might not always reflect what is maintained.

    Westgate Trailhead - From Walla Walla, take HWY 12 westbound 29 miles to Wallula Junction and turn right to keep on HWY 12. Continue through Pasco, cross over the Columbia River and take exit 3B. Turn right on Queensgate Drive, then left on Duportail Street. In about a 1/4 mile turn right onto Kennedy Road. Follow for 1.5 miles and turn left onto Dallas Road. In a mile you will see signage for the trailhead located on your left.

    Badger Mountain Trailhead - From Walla Walla, take HWY 12 westbound 29 miles to Wallula Junction and turn right to keep on HWY 12. Continue through Pasco, cross over the Columbia River and take exit 3A putting you on Queensgate Drive. Follow for half a mile and turn left on Keene Road. Drive another half mile and turn right onto Shockley Road, which will become Queensgate Drive after a sharp left bend, drive another 1/4 mile and the parking area is on your right.

Please do not solely rely on Google Maps as their route might not always reflect what is maintained.

  • Your Public Lands

    Badger Mountain Centennial Preserve is a Benton County Park, managed in partnership with Friends of Badger Mountain, a local volunteer organization, and with assistance from the City of Richland.

  • Distance:

    Within 1.5 Hours

  • Difficulty Level:

    Day Tripper, Adventurer

  • Seasons:

    Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter

  • Elevation:

    769 feet (Badger Mountain Trailhead) or 920 (Westgate Trailhead) - 1,579 feet

  • Pets:

    Yes

  • Reservations:

    N/A

  • ADA:

    No

  • Multi-Use:

    Yes

  • Motorized Vehicles :

    No

  • Fees

    None

  • Permits

    None

  • Regulations

    Stay on designated trails. Pets are allowed but must be leashed. Share the trails and be good stewards of the land. No fires or fireworks.

  • Amenities

    The Westgate Trailhead has a portable bathroom. The Badger Mountain Trailhead has restrooms and water at Trailhead Park. There are no restrooms, water, or sitting benches along the trails.

  • Wildlife Awareness

    We are all so fortunate to recreate in the Blue Mountains. So many opportunities exist to play outside whether in a national forest, wilderness area, on a Wild and Scenic River, and more! With these opportunities comes great responsibility to appreciate that we are mere visitors and should all take pride in being good stewards of the wild. Many animals call these protected places home, including moose, elk, bear, cougar, bobcat, and snakes to name a few. Take precautions to respect their home and understand the appropriate response should an encounter occur. Additionally, many plant species thrive in the Blue Mountains, so staying on trail is always good practice. Carry First Aid supplies to better respond to accidents or encounters, and always let others know where the day's adventure is taking you.

  • Field Notes

    Navigation: Consider downloading the Avenza Map app. This app allows users to upload three maps (or unlimited with a subscription) to use offline. It can track your location offline and overlay GPS data from the phone onto the map. The vehicle use maps (for trails allowing motorized vehicles) are the easiest to use. Otherwise, Geo Tracker offers similar tracking capabilities and additional details about your adventure. If no service, Geo Tracker will at least show your location. The Blue Mountains and surrounding area offer a remote recreating experience, and knowing your location is paramount to staying safe. Always make sure to bring paper maps. Tell others where your adventure is taking you and when you expect to return.

    Difficulty Level: Here is what we are thinking when we assign a difficulty level: Day Tripper--You don't have much experience in the area but want to get outside! Great for families of all ages. Adventurer--You know your way around the Blue Mountains and love a leisurely day outdoors. Mountaineer--You are ready for a challenge. Wild places excite you and sweat is the goal. Small children beware. Keep in mind some activities may apply to multiple difficulty levels based on usage.

    Pets: In general, pets are allowed on a leash and under control throughout jurisdictions. The only restrictions we have encountered are around swimming areas. As a best practice, be mindful of riparian habitat in general. You never know where a precious spawning area might be located. Pack it in and pack it out applies to your furry friend as well.